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Thread: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

  1. #1

    Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    Hello guys,

    I have a senior telemaster i would like to fly for long durations FPV flying. which setup would you recommend ? electric ? nitro ? gasoline ?

    Electric is the cleanest for FPV for sure, but i guess it would be hard to get the duration (at least 1 hour) on an electric setup - please express your thoughts.

    any well proven long duration electric setups for the Senior telemaster ?

    thanks.

  2. #2

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    Hey, I fly nothing but electric, and electric is not the best for duration flights. The best I can do is 10 minutes, with a 5s 5000MaH. I hope this helps.

  3. #3

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    I hope to have mine up in the next two weeks. I'll let you know how it goes. I modified the battery area and cockpit area to accept 4 lipos, 4SP1's, 5000 mah's. They are mounted on a sliding battery compartment so I can adjust them to tweak the CG depending on what camera gear is carried in the rear, (might be none at times).

    I hope to run a bench test this weekend with just two of the lipo's at half throttle and see what kind of times I get. For practice flying I'll probably fly it with just the 2 lipos and no camera gear. Other times I hope to fly it loaded out with the camera gear, 4 lipo's and eventually some autonomous control and data loggers.

    Tiller

  4. #4

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    Update: I just came in from doing my first bench test with a newly built arf senior. With the two lipos mentioned above, on the bench, I ran for 5 minutes for a shakedown and slowly took it up to half throttle. I checked all the mounts and nuts and bolts and then ran it again for another 18 minutes. Dummy me, (my first plane I'm putting together, second plane), forgot there is no airflow over the motor on the bench. I think the engine shutdown from overheating. At least I know that shutdown works! :oops:

    I'm running an AXi 4130/20 motor with a 16 x 10e prop. The lipos are two 5800 mAh 4-cells wired in series.

    I tested each battery at that point and had an average of 3.3 v in one and 3.4 average in the other. So I was probably pretty close to the ESC cutoff. I'll let the engine cool tonight and hook up the lipos again tomorrow until the ESC cuts in. But so far about 23 minutes on this bench test. I hope to actually fly her next weekend.

    I'm not sure how well the bench test will translate to airtime. The power at half throttle was pretty amazing. I'm not sure if I'll often fly it that fast for what we do. On the other hand, I wasn't using any controls either so it might even out a bit.

    I'm hoping for 20 minutes on 2 lipo's and 30-40 with 4.

    Tiller

  5. #5

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    Yeah, never ever bench test like that. Only run it for less than a minute max. It works everything extra hard when you do that and you could cause a failure, I've seen it over and over.

    Good luck with the duration, sounds like a fun way to FPV.

    Jason

  6. #6

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    Wouldn't I rather find a failure on the bench than in the air? Not trying to be smart but I'm new to this and I haven't seen to many articles on stress testing a model and it's components before actually flying it.

    I also have never actually "seen" the behavior of an ESC cutoff when the power gets low. I'd rather see how it behaves on the bench than for the first time in the air.

    I still haven't run it up to full throttle yet. I think I might need to anchor down my sawhorses I have the fuselage on. I was running it with no wings and at less then half power the fuselage was pulled forward until the wheel carriage snugged up against the front saw horse. I could actual get the tail to lift a bit off the back by actuating the elevators a bit.

    I'd be interested to know what other modelers do to test new planes, equipment, etc. before they actually fly them. Being somewhat a quality control geek in my real job, I'm more than a bit interested in this topic.

    The last thing I want is a critical bolt, wire or glue joint to come undone by vibration in the air. Or to find a battery doesn't have the expected service time I thought it would have. Maybe I'm a bit anal that way.

    Tiller

  7. #7

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    Hey just thought i would let you guys know, im about 8 flights into my new plus, first maiden i had to add about 1 1/2 lbs to the front of the plane to get my cg, so i added another 5000mah battery for a total of 10,000 mah @ 18.5 v, im getting about a half hour of flight time, just awesome, also added a cowling, no problems at all just love the plane, btw everything else is as suggested

  8. #8

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiller58
    Wouldn't I rather find a failure on the bench than in the air? Not trying to be smart but I'm new to this and I haven't seen to many articles on stress testing a model and it's components before actually flying it.

    I also have never actually "seen" the behavior of an ESC cutoff when the power gets low. I'd rather see how it behaves on the bench than for the first time in the air.

    I still haven't run it up to full throttle yet. I think I might need to anchor down my sawhorses I have the fuselage on. I was running it with no wings and at less then half power the fuselage was pulled forward until the wheel carriage snugged up against the front saw horse. I could actual get the tail to lift a bit off the back by actuating the elevators a bit.

    I'd be interested to know what other modelers do to test new planes, equipment, etc. before they actually fly them. Being somewhat a quality control geek in my real job, I'm more than a bit interested in this topic.

    The last thing I want is a critical bolt, wire or glue joint to come undone by vibration in the air. Or to find a battery doesn't have the expected service time I thought it would have. Maybe I'm a bit anal that way.

    Tiller

    Yes, but bench testing like that will cause a failure that will never happen under normal operational use. It is way too hard on the system. The prop doesn't unload like it does while moving through the air and ends up pulling sometimes lots more amps than it normally would. Couple that with no airflow over anything and the motor, esc, and battery all are working harder. Do that for more than a minute and there is a good chance you will let the "Genie" out of something. If you've never let the "Genie" out before, it's when you smoke something and a puff of smoke emits out of the component. Smells nice too. Anyway, bench testing is good for an initial run up for 30 seconds or less to make sure the system works. We sometimes hook up a watt meter to measure the amps/watts/voltage etc under load. That gives you an idea of the system is doing, but you just have to know that it will be less in the air by 10-15%. You should check your bolts, prop, motor, and tightness of everything before flying. Hope this helps. The more important thing for any pre-flight is to remember to have fun!

  9. #9

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    I'm having fun! But when this is non profits $$ and the use of the plane is primarily for search and rescue, the fun has to secondary. Mission readiness is number one.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Posts
    26

    Re: Senior Telemaster long duration setup for FPV

    I'd be interested to know what other modelers do to test new planes, equipment, etc. before they actually fly them. Being somewhat a quality control geek in my real job, I'm more than a bit interested in this topic
    Jason is absolutely correct on this one....I have learned the hard way!!! I now just hook everything up and slowly run up to full power several times...checking how the speed control handles the motor and record max amperage/wattage with my "watt's up meter"...... :mrgreen:

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